Campus Safety and Accountability Act Action

Your voice matters! Call on your Representatives to take action. Contacting your representative is easy and takes about 5 minutes.

  1. Get informed: learn about CASA.
  2. Contact your representatives by phone, email, or direct mail to voice your support for CASA.
  3. Spread the word about CASA. Use the hashtag #Takenoforanswer  and #YCA to spread the word.

Learn more about CASA

In 2016, The Bureau of Justice Statistics released the Campus Climate Validation Study confirming that approximately 1 in 4 college women and 1 in 16 college men are sexually assaulted before they graduate. Yet, 41% of colleges and universities recently surveyed have not conducted a single investigation into an allegation of sexual violence on their campus in the past five years.

Every student has the right to an education free from violence. If a student experiences violence, that student deserves quality support, and a transparent and fair investigation process.

The bipartisan Campus Safety and Accountability Act (CASA) ensures that allegations of campus sexual assault cases are handled with professionalism and fairness. CASA’s provisions are also designed to protect and empower students.

Current federal law doesn’t substantially prohibit colleges and universities from under-reporting incidences of sexual assault. CASA flips the incentives for colleges and universities and makes reporting sexual assault part of the solution, not the problem.


Key Talking Points:

  1. Establishing new campus resources and support services for student survivors. Colleges and universities would be required to designate Confidential Advisors to assist survivors of sexual harassment, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking. Confidential Advisors would coordinate support services and accommodations for survivors, provide information about options for reporting and provide guidance or assistance – at the direction of the survivor – in reporting the crime to campus authorities and/or local law enforcement. Schools would no longer be allowed to sanction students who report sexual violence but reveal a non- violent student conduct violation, like underage drinking, in good faith.
  2. Ensuring minimum training standards for on-campus personnel
    The lack of training for campus personnel can interfere with sexual assault investigations and student disciplinary proceedings, resulting in negative outcomes for both survivors and accused students. This legislation would ensure that everyone from the Confidential Advisor to those responsible for investigating and participating in student disciplinary proceedings would receive specialized training, so that they would have a firm understanding of the nature of these crimes and their effect on survivors

Creating historic new transparency requirements

  1. Students at every university in America would be surveyed about their experience with sexual violence. The new biennial survey would be standardized and anonymous. Colleges and universities would publish the results online, and the Department of Education would be required to publish the names of all schools with pending investigations, final resolutions, and voluntary resolution agreements related to Title IX with respect to sexual violence
  2. Requiring a uniform discipline process and coordination with law enforcement
    All schools would use one uniform process for campus student disciplinary proceedings and would no longer be allowed to have athletic departments or other subgroups handle complaints of sexual violence against members of that subgroup. Both survivors and accused students would receive notification if schools proceed with a disciplinary process regarding an allegation of sexual assault within 24 hours of such decision being made. Colleges and universities would be required to enter into memoranda of understanding to clearly delineate responsibilities and share information with each local law enforcement agency that has jurisdiction to report to a campus as a first responder
  3. Establishing enforcable Title IX penalties and stiffer penalties for Clery Act violations. Schools that do not comply with certain requirements under the bill may face a penalty of up to 1 percent of the institution’s operating budget. Currently, the only allowable penalty is the loss of all financial aid, which is not practical and has never been done. The bill would increase penalties for Clery Act violations to up to $150,000 per violation, from the current penalty of $35,000 per violation.

CASA will be reviewed by senators in the Health, Education, Labor & Pensions (HELP) Committee. The support of these senators is key in the passage of the full bill. HELP Committee Members:
Lamar Alexander, Chair (R-TN)  Tammy Baldwin (D-WI)
Michael F. Bennet (D-CO)           Richard Burr (R-NC)
Robert P. Casey, Jr. (D-PA)         Bill Cassidy, M.D. (R-LA)
Susan Collins (R-ME)                 Michael B. Enzi (R-WY)
Al Franken (D-MN)                     Orrin Hatch (R-UT)
Johnny Isakson (R-GA)              Todd Young (R-IN)
Maggie Hassan (D-NH)              Lisa Murkowski (R-AK)
Patty Murray (D-WA)                  Christopher S. Murphy (D-CT)
Rand Paul (R-KY)                      Pat Roberts (R-KS)
Bernie Sanders (I-VT)               Tim Scott (R-SC)
Elizabeth Warren (D-MA)          Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI)

 

CASA will be reviewed by representatives in the Sub Committee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security and Investigations of the House Judiciary Committee. The support of these representatives key in the passage of the full bill. HELP Committee Members:

Trey Gowdy, Chairman (R-SC4)              Shelia Jackson Lee (D-TX18)

Louie Gohmert (R-TX1)                           Ted Deutch (D-FL22)

Jim Sensenbrenner (R-WI5)                    Karen Bass (D-CA38)

Steve Chabot (R-OH1)                            Cedric Richmond ( D-LA2)

Ted Poe (R-TX2)                                      Hakeem Jeffries (D-NY8)

John Ratcliffe (R-TX4)                              Ted Lieu (D-CA33)

Martha Roby (R-AL2)                               Jamie Raskin (D-MD8)

Mike Johnson (R-LA4)

While we need the support of the senate and house as a whole, the members of this committee are particularly important to contact in the bill’s current stage. If you live in the states of any of the senators or representatives above, please consider contacting them to stress the importance of this legislation. Please reach out to us at info@youthcaucusamerica.org  if you have any questions.

*Please note that some of the senators and representatives above have already signed on as co-sponsors for CASA. We thank them for their leadership.

Phone:

https://www.nationalpriorities.org/take-action/contact-your-representative/

  1. “click this link”(above) to find your Representatives and Senators
  2. Make a call during normal business hours or leave a message
  3. Express your support for CASA using these talking points:
    1. 1 in 4 women and 1:16 men will be sexually assaulted before they graduate
    2. Despite the prevalence of campus sexual assault – only 41 percent of schools have investigated an allegation of assault in the last five years
    3. CASA improves school’s support systems for survivors of assault through ensuring the presence of  confidential advisors, support services, and training for relevant personnel
    4. CASA ensures schools are transparent and fair in how they handle allegations of assault
    5. CASA incentivizes schools to take action on this issue by implementing meaningful sanctions for violating Title IX or the Clery Act

Email

https://www.nationalpriorities.org/take-action/contact-your-representative/

  1. “click this link”(above) to find your Representatives and Senators
  2. Copy and paste email template
    1. Dear Honorable Representative or Senator __________,

I am writing to express support for the Campus Accountability and Safety Act (CASA). In 2016, The Bureau of Justice Statistics released the Campus Climate Validation Study stating that approximately 1 in 4 college women and 1 in 16 college men are sexually assaulted before they graduate. Yet, 41 percent of colleges and universities recently surveyed have not conducted a single investigation into an allegation of sexual violence on their campus in the past five years. The bipartisan Campus Safety and Accountability Act (CASA) ensures that allegations of campus sexual assault cases are handled with professionalism, transparency, and fairness. CASA’s provisions are designed to better protect and empower students. CASA ensures survivors have access to resources and services through confidential advisors. These advisors can connect survivors with the accommodations they need while maintaining their autonomy — allowing them to report when they are ready. CASA facilitates reporting by establishing amnesty for students who report sexual violence but report a non-violent student conduct violation like underage drinking. CASA ensures that relevant on-campus personnel are adequately trained to respond to incidences of sexual violence and understand their effects on survivors. CASA requires a uniform discipline process and coordination with law enforcement to ensure cases are handled in a timely, fair manner. CASA holds institutions accountable for protecting students and supporting survivors through establishing enforceable Title IX penalties and stiffer penalties for Clery Act violations. I ask that you support CASA because every student has a right to an education free from sexual violence.

  1.  Add personal if you would like
  2. CC info@youthcaucusamerica.org

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